Monday, May 18, 2009

NACE Can't Sugarcoat: Job Market for New Grads Sucks


You can usually rely on the National Association of Colleges and Employers for some happy talk about how this year is the "best ever" for employment for new grads.

Not in 2009.

"NACE’s 2009 Student Survey shows that just 19.7 percent of 2009 graduates who applied for a job actually have one. In comparison, 51 percent of those graduating in 2007 and 26 percent of those graduating in 2008 who had applied for a job had one in hand by the time of graduation."

Not only have fewer found jobs, fewer are even looking for work. And, interestingly, you don't see too many going to grad school, either.
What's the plan, guys? Move to Norway?

chart via Planet Money

3 comments:

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Anonymous said...

2008 Grad here... Laid off in February, took some time off, and from April until now still seeking work with a B.S. in Business in hand.

It's brutal out there. The best you can do is apply all over the place and follow up like a dog.

Possible reasons why fewer grads are applying: a.) They want to take a break after graduation and "wait out" the rough economy this summer b.) They've become apathetic after the realization that their job hunting effots are fruitless.

John said...

It's the good topic to write on. Job options are getting less day by day. It's not only for the fresh graduated, but if we survey overall job crisis, the percentage will be higher than what we are getting here.

The number of student going to grad school are less, might be because they know the present situation of fresh graduates and thinking of getting into work rather than going to grad school.